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Old Town of A Coruna
Old Town of A Coruna
Posted in: Spain

Aside from Santiago de Compostela, Galicia also boasts of A Coruńa – another World Heritage Site in the region. The city is served by its very own airport, which offers local and international connections. The airport is located about 5 miles from the city center…

Aside from Santiago de Compostela, Galicia also boasts of A Coruńa – another World Heritage Site in the region. The city is served by its very own airport, which offers local and international connections. The airport is located about 5 miles from the city center and easily reachable by bus or taxi. If you are coming from nearby Spanish destinations, trains and buses are cheaper alternatives.

A Coruńa, also known as Corunna, is the land of Celtic legends with a perfect mixture of rich Roman heritage. It’s long and interesting history is a delight to discover and its splendid landscape is a visual treat as well. This stunning city is surrounded by cerulean seas, with the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the Bay of Biscay to the north offering thrilling opportunities for water sports enthusiasts. The modern metro is also home to a thriving fashion and textile industry, as shown by the many trendy shops scattered around here. So, one can be sure to find plenty of things to do in the area.

The city’s seafront promenade of Paseo Maritimo is the perfect place for scenic strolls but if you are not up for a walk, there is the seaside tram that will take you for an easy breezy sightseeing tour.

Plaza Maria Pita is the ideal starting point for amblers eager for a walking exploration of the medieval center of A Coruňa. This atmospheric square features the statue of a local heroine, none other than its namesake Maria. Its lovely arcades are a charming touch and its many elegant cafes provide a strategic location for uninterrupted people watching in the area.

From there, head to the city’s most popular attraction – the Torre de Hercules – which, according to legends, is built by Hercules himself. Legends aside, the tower is the only remaining Roman working lighthouse in the planet. Climb its 200 steps to the top and reward yourself with fabulous views of the coastline and the charming landscape of A Coruńa.

There are also several historic churches in the city that are worth exploring. But, if you only have time for one, then make it the 12th century Church of Santa Maria which is located in the highest part of the old town. This Romanesque structure features three naves and a beautiful Gothic rose window. Also worth visiting is the nearby Museum of Holy Art with an impressive collection of religious artwork.

If you are interested in ancient weaponry, the Museo Militar Regional is your next stop. There are over 1,500 items on display from various kinds of armaments to battlefield models from the 18th to 20th century. Not far away from the museum is the Jardin de San Carlos, which is a fine spot to rest your weary feet while you enjoy the lush scenery it affords.

Finally, after soaking up the picturesque atmosphere of the park and the waterfront, head to the end of the bay, all the way to the small island where the 16th century Castelo de San Anton stands. The castle once served as a prison, which explains its location. Now, it houses the vast collection of the Archaeology and History Museum where you will find a wide array of artifacts, historical relics and jewelry, among others and gain a better understanding of A Coruńa and its past.

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